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zohargolan
04 August 2011, 0036
Hi All,

I've started my project 2 weeks ago and already posted my introduction in the "come on in" forum (http://www.elmoto.net/showthread.php?1523-Hello-everybody-I-am-new-here) I've got a lot of great feadbacks from you guys which sent me back to the excel sheet for more calculations. Meanwhile I started working on the bike and last weekend I removed all of the greasy, smelly, and dirty ICE parts (see below). I put them on Craigslist and EBAY, maybe somebody can find them useful.Here is most of what I removed from the bike.
1494
Here is how the motorcycle looked like after removing all of the components.
1495
It looks a little bit naked, but don't worry...soon enough I will have to squeeze in all of the electrical components, which is definitly going to be a chalange.

I think I might need to modify the chassis to be able to put the batteries. My goal is to put at least 3 SLA batteries for a 36v system with a capacity of at least 80AH each. I would prefer to put four of them thou to create a 48v system, but this will probably require cutting the chassis and squaring the bottom of the old engine cage. The emphasis is on 80AH batteries or more, which according to the calculations should give me a range of more than 30miles.

I will try to update as the project goes

Zohar

SplinterOz
04 August 2011, 0226
Looks nice mate. What type of motor are you planning?

zohargolan
04 August 2011, 0740
Looks nice mate. What type of motor are you planning?
I am planning on the standard either ETEK or ME0708 for a motor and Alltrax AXE4844 or AXE4845 as a controller (depending of I can find and how much it will cost). I still don't know which batteries I'll use. I will first mount the motor and then see what batteries I can fit (cardboard box mock up method).

electriKAT
04 August 2011, 0804
I would suggest going with the highest system voltage you can. 36V is pretty low. You'll have to pull more current, and that means more losses (less efficient). Since you're controller will support 48V, I'd at least go with that. Though you might consider going to 72V. Alltrax and others make controllers at this voltage. Your range will mostly depend on the total engergy in the pack, which is the product of ah * voltage. In your case:

80ah * 36V = 2.88kwh

At 48V you would need four 60ah batteries to achieve the same pack size. And four smaller batteries may be easier to find room for compared to three larger ones.

Not to burst your bubble, but lead acid batteries do not have as much useable energy as lithium for example. I currently have a 4kwh lead acid pack in my bike and I'm getting a useable range of about 20 miles. My batteries aren't very good, but that gives you some idea of what to expect. I think 30 miles on a 2.88kwh lead acid pack is unlikely.

zohargolan
04 August 2011, 0847
I would suggest going with the highest system voltage you can. 36V is pretty low. You'll have to pull more current, and that means more losses (less efficient). Since you're controller will support 48V, I'd at least go with that. Though you might consider going to 72V. Alltrax and others make controllers at this voltage. Your range will mostly depend on the total engergy in the pack, which is the product of ah * voltage. In your case:

80ah * 36V = 2.88kwh

At 48V you would need four 60ah batteries to achieve the same pack size. And four smaller batteries may be easier to find room for compared to three larger ones.

Hi Kat,
From what I understand, if you will use 80A from an 80AH battery, it will discharge in an hour. If you will use 80A from a 40AH battery it will not discharge in 1/2 an hour but more like in 15 minutes. This is my motivation to use 3 X 80AH batteries and not 4 X 60AH. But if I can fit 4 X 80AH, I will deffinitly do that. It is all a question of what I can fit on the bike


Not to burst your bubble, but lead acid batteries do not have as much useable energy as lithium for example. I currently have a 4kwh lead acid pack in my bike and I'm getting a useable range of about 20 miles. My batteries aren't very good, but that gives you some idea of what to expect. I think 30 miles on a 2.88kwh lead acid pack is unlikely.
What is the capacity of the batteries in your pack?

electriKAT
04 August 2011, 0934
From what I understand, if you will use 80A from an 80AH battery, it will discharge in an hour. If you will use 80A from a 40AH battery it will not discharge in 1/2 an hour but more like in 15 minutes. This is my motivation to use 3 X 80AH batteries and not 4 X 60AH. But if I can fit 4 X 80AH, I will deffinitly do that. It is all a question of what I can fit on the bike

What you say is true, but you're not making an apples to apples comparison. You don't want to look at current; you want to look at power, which is current * voltage. Using your numbers:

If you draw 80A from your 36V pack, you're drawing 2.88kw.

80A * 36V = 2880W

But if you've got a 48V pack, you only need to draw 60A to make the same power.

2880W / 48V = 60A

As I mentioned before, for the same size pack (2.88hwh) at 48V, you'd be using 60ah batteries. So 60A from a 60ah battery, or 80A from an 80ah battery is essentially the same; you're drawing 1C. But since losses are proportional to the square of the current, drawing 60A instead of 80A will be more efficient.


What is the capacity of the batteries in your pack?

I'm using six 60ah batteries (72V pack, 4kwh).

zohargolan
04 August 2011, 2024
There are couple of rusted areas on the bike that need to be treated. Some of them are on the chassis. I am not worried about those for now because I am going to have some cuts and welds there anyway.
The other rusted areas are on the chrome plated, handlebars, forks and wheels, and those needs to be treated. If the goal of the project was to do a full restoration of a 1971 Honda SL175 motorcycle, then the right thing to do was to treat the rust and then to re-chrome all of the chrome plated parts. Well … This is not the purpose of the project. I decided to try and paint the chrome plated parts.
I started with the handlebars. I removed them from the motorcycle. And this is how they look.
1498
1499
I sanded the rust with an angle grinder and then primed them with a a rust-oleom self etching primer and painted them with a rust-oleom hammered gray spray.
When I came to inspect the results of the painting I realized something I didn’t like. The whole handlebar assembly is totally distorted. The motorcycle must have been dropped at least once in its 41 years life and the whole handle bar bent. I tried streightening it with a big hummer, but it is still too crooked. I eneded up ordering another one out of EBAY.
All in all, the painting was ok, but I should sand it with a finer grit paper after sanding the rust. I guess I will try this method on the forks also. I hope I won’t have to do the same for the wheels and I will be able to just clean them.

Any ideas of how to treat those rust areas on the chrome plated parts?

Jack Riggi
04 August 2011, 2035
You really don't look like you have that many parts. Here's a picture of all the parts I took off my Honda Goldwing when I stripped my bike down. I am really glad to get rid of all those dirty greasy oily dirty gasoline motor parts. I can't believe how much all those parts weighed and how much lighter my bike is now. The picture doesn't even show the motor block and transmission and all the parts in that picture when I took it apart, unreal.

zohargolan
04 August 2011, 2132
You really don't look like you have that many parts

I know...
It took me like 2 hours to remove all of this stuff. I was expecting to spend the whole day on that :p

Jack Riggi
04 August 2011, 2203
Took me over two days to get mine stripped Down. I wasted half a day just trying to get the gas tank out, I just couldn't get it so when all else fails read the book. Got it out the next day after removing the rear wheel both side bags and the back box plus the two-piece rear fender and also one shock. I've never seen the gas tank on a motorcycle come out of the back before.

zohargolan
04 August 2011, 2207
Took me over two days to get mine stripped Down. I wasted half a day just trying to get the gas tank out, I just couldn't get it so when all else fails read the book. Got it out the next day after removing the rear wheel both side bags and the back box plus the two-piece rear fender and also one shock. I've never seen the gas tank on a motorcycle come out of the back before.

Hey.. I believe you've selected the most complicated motorcycle of all ... well, at least you will have a lot of space to put batteries, so will have less of a straggle. In my small chassis it will be FUN to find place for the batteries

podolefsky
04 August 2011, 2325
Hi Kat,
From what I understand, if you will use 80A from an 80AH battery, it will discharge in an hour. If you will use 80A from a 40AH battery it will not discharge in 1/2 an hour but more like in 15 minutes. This is my motivation to use 3 X 80AH batteries and not 4 X 60AH. But if I can fit 4 X 80AH, I will deffinitly do that. It is all a question of what I can fit on the bike


You're right that the more amps you pull, the less Ah you will get out of the cell. But an 80 Ah SLA battery won't give you 80 amps for 1 hour.

Most of the time with lead acid, the Ah rating is for 10 or 20 hours (it depends, need to look at the spec sheet). So if you discharge an 80 Ah battery over 20 hours, you will get 80 Ah out of it. But if you discharge it in 1 hour you might only get 40 Ah (again it depends, need to look at the specs, some are better than others).

Another way of putting it is that if you pull 80 amps from an 80 Ah SLA battery, it will probably be dead in about 30 minutes (not 1 hour).

This is different with lithium because of the way they are rated - lithium batteries are usually rated at 0.5C or 1C, so an 80 Ah lithium battery putting out 80 amps will actually go for an hour (or close to it).

By the way, Amps = C rate * Ah. 1C for 80Ah means 80 amps. 0.5C means 40 amps. C/20 means 4 amps.

Saruman
05 August 2011, 0508
If you want to try and predict how much power your batteries will give you, you'll need to find the Peukert number for the batteries you try to use. Furthermore you need to know the current you're going to draw battery-side - either on-average, or peek, or the actual current for each leg of your motorcycle's mission profile. and finally you'll need to settle on a depth-of-discharge level that you wish to maintain (for lead batteries, 80% DoD is what's usually advised).
I've outlined the Peukert-related calculations in this paper (http://www.saruman-electromotive.nl/download/en/Peukert_paper_v1.pdf). As a data point for your battery design: I'm going for 12 x 45Ah batteries in a 6s2p configuration. Nominally (at C/20) that's supposed to give me 6.48kW (72V x 90A x 1h) but my bike will be able to pull 4.0 kW, after which I'll hit 80%DoD (I've got 4.9kW to 100%DoD). This is with pretty good (and somewhat expensive) AGM lead batteries, each weiging 12.5kg, so I've got 150kg of batteries on my big bad CB750F based bike. Peukert constant for these batteries is calculated to be 1.0898, Peukert capacity 48.4Ah for each 12V battery.

zohargolan
05 August 2011, 2016
There are couple of rusted areas on the bike that need to be treated. Some of them are on the chassis. I am not worried about those for now because I am going to have some cuts and welds there anyway.
The other rusted areas are on the chrome plated, handlebars, forks and wheels, and those needs to be treated. If the goal of the project was to do a full restoration of a 1971 Honda SL175 motorcycle, then the right thing to do was to treat the rust and then to re-chrome all of the chrome plated parts. Well … This is not the purpose of the project. I decided to try and paint the chrome plated parts.
I started with the handlebars. I removed them from the motorcycle. And this is how they look.
1498
1499
I sanded the rust with an angle grinder and then primed them with a a rust-oleom self etching primer and painted them with a rust-oleom hammered gray spray.
When I came to inspect the results of the painting I realized something I didn’t like. The whole handlebar assembly is totally distorted. The motorcycle must have been dropped at least once in its 41 years life and the whole handle bar bent. I tried streightening it with a big hummer, but it is still too crooked. I eneded up ordering another one out of EBAY.
All in all, the painting was ok, but I should sand it with a finer grit paper after sanding the rust. I guess I will try this method on the forks also. I hope I won’t have to do the same for the wheels and I will be able to just clean them.

Any ideas of how to treat those rust areas on the chrome plated parts?

ideas anyone?

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 1255
Today I went to Burlingame which is an hour drive from my home to buy a motor and a controller. The guy advertised them on Craigslist. When I exchanged some emails with him, he told me he started a motorcycle conversion with his son and they lost interest before they even installed the parts. He was asking $700 for both and I reduced his price by email to $650.
When I came to see the parts, I managed to get some more information from the guy. Apparently he bought the motor from another guy that also started a project and didn’t finish (I hope this motor does not have a bad mojo :( ). The controller is Alltrax AXE4845 which is 48v/400A. He bought the controller out of EBAY I believe, and from the look of it, it was already installed somewhere. Anyway, I bought both of them along with a mounting plate he started to make. All for $600. I hope it was not a mistake. Here is how the parts look like.
1508
Now for figuring out the motor placement and the space for the battery.

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 1407
I am looking for the best way to mount the motor to the chassis. When looking from the sprocket side, the motor can fit nicely inside the old engine mount.
1509
When looking from the other side thou, the old engine mount is stopping the motor from going ¼” - ½” further.
1510
I think I am going to start by cutting the engine mount on the back, like the picture bellow. Then I can place the motor exactly where I want it and then I can design the mount.
1511

Any suggestions, comment, ideas? Please speak now before I start the chassis cutting :p

podolefsky
06 August 2011, 2016
Looks good to me! Doesn't seem like the right side engine mount has any use - cut away.

Couple things when designing your mount. Make sure you get the chain line right, both vertically and horizontally. The chain will need to clear the swingarm pivot, and you want it as close to inline with the rear axle and pivot as possible (or slightly below to allow for suspension sag).

Also make sure that the way you mount the motor lets you make a straight chain line (front and rear sprockets line up).

This might all be obvious, just putting it out there.

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 2214
Looks good to me! Doesn't seem like the right side engine mount has any use - cut away.

Thank you Noah,
I actually already cut it (see post below)


This might all be obvious, just putting it out there.
I appreciate it. This is where I usually messing up :P

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 2235
This post was removed

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 2323
If you want to try and predict how much power your batteries will give you, you'll need to find the Peukert number for the batteries you try to use. Furthermore you need to know the current you're going to draw battery-side - either on-average, or peek, or the actual current for each leg of your motorcycle's mission profile. and finally you'll need to settle on a depth-of-discharge level that you wish to maintain (for lead batteries, 80% DoD is what's usually advised).
I've outlined the Peukert-related calculations in this paper (http://www.saruman-electromotive.nl/download/en/Peukert_paper_v1.pdf). As a data point for your battery design: I'm going for 12 x 45Ah batteries in a 6s2p configuration. Nominally (at C/20) that's supposed to give me 6.48kW (72V x 90A x 1h) but my bike will be able to pull 4.0 kW, after which I'll hit 80%DoD (I've got 4.9kW to 100%DoD). This is with pretty good (and somewhat expensive) AGM lead batteries, each weiging 12.5kg, so I've got 150kg of batteries on my big bad CB750F based bike. Peukert constant for these batteries is calculated to be 1.0898, Peukert capacity 48.4Ah for each 12V battery.

Thank you Jan,
Your paper is very informative and easy to follow. I didnt know about this Peukert coefficient at all. I notices that some battery manufactures are giving the amp hr capacity for different amount of time. So for instance they will have 20AmpHr for 20 hours, 19AmpHr for 10hours 18AmpHr for 6 hours ... and 13AmpHr for 1 hour. Is this equivalent to the Peukert calculations?

zohargolan
06 August 2011, 2334
I went ahead and cut the engine mount to fit the motor. I first marked it similar to the above design and then cut it with an angle grinder.
1515
The end result looks pretty good
1517
This is how it looks on the chain side
1516
Now I need to design the mounting plate.

Saruman
07 August 2011, 0109
I notices that some battery manufactures are giving the amp hr capacity for different amount of time. So for instance they will have 20AmpHr for 20 hours, 19AmpHr for 10hours 18AmpHr for 6 hours ... and 13AmpHr for 1 hour. Is this equivalent to the Peukert calculations?I'm not sure what you mean with "equivalent".
Keep in mind that the Peukert equation is really "only" an observational correlation. I assume that the manufacturer's specs are real, test-confirmed data (although probably not for the ultracheap stuff). Each stated capacity-for-discharge-time is a single data point, that is supposed to be on, or at least very near, the Peukert curve for that battery. Thus you need at least two of these points to get to these Peukert values for this particular battery. And if you have more than two points, you can do data fitting, which gives you a better estimate for your Peukert values (but you need some numerical mathematics there). Does this answer your question?

larryrose11
07 August 2011, 0509
Now I need to design the mounting plate.

I believe Ted has a mount for this motor, (but I cant be sure) on his vintage Yamaha. Hit him up. he probably can sent ya the CAD file.
His page: http://www.elmoto.net/member.php?16-teddillard

teddillard
07 August 2011, 0607
Yup, that motor and almost any other... it's a standard NEMA C mount pattern. I'd be happy to send you the CAD file but the guy who cut it said he had to pretty much rebuild it. Probably take you less time to just do it yourself. The hard part is making the face-to-frame dimensions anyway.

Here's what mine looks like:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/166439_1815521267309_1218396040_32145714_2852147_n .jpg

In the frame:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/167786_1820696916697_1218396040_32157947_279000_n. jpg

zohargolan
07 August 2011, 0930
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/167786_1820696916697_1218396040_32157947_279000_n. jpg
This is a beautiful piece of work. Where did you cut it and how much did it cost? I was looking at emachineshop.com and it was couple of hundred bucks to make a piece like that.
I think I will stay with the more simplistic approach of home made plate. Couple of drill holes and couple of straight cuts. Its not gona be pretty :p.

zohargolan
07 August 2011, 2054
Tedd,

I think you've mentioned in one of the forums, how exactly you designed this plate. something to do with importing the image to photoshop and then somehow port it to your cad software. I am using open source Gimp (similar functionality as photoshop) and considering the free solid edge 2d. I don't think you can import images to solid edge and I don't think you can port DXF to Gimp.
Any tips?

Zohar

teddillard
08 August 2011, 0308
Thanks!

Here's what I did... I shot a photo of the area with as straight-on a perspective as possible, just like you did with the motor. I had a ruler in the shot, and then scaled the photo in Photoshop so the image size was the same as the actual area (by using the ruler). Then I drew out the shape and added the dimensions of the motor face using the drawings from the motor manufacturer.

Then I printed it on heavy paper and cut it out to check the fit. I think I had to make a few adjustments and do that two or three times, to match the frame well.

Then I used TurboCad to make a CAD drawing with all the dimensions correct, taking them manually from the PhotoShop image. I thought my buddy could use that, but he just programmed the CNC miller using a drawing that he rebuilt again.

I got it done by a friend in a local shop, he charged me $100. Take a look at BigBlueSaw.com, I think their price is about the same.

zohargolan
09 August 2011, 0003
I like this method. I will try to do the same, but I think at first try I will try to make the faceplate myself. A very simple faceplate with minimal cuts, and drill holes. We'll see how it goes

Allen_okc
09 August 2011, 0821
can we place eps files in this site for others to download - cause Ted and i can convert it to a CAD drawing that is set to scale...

zohargolan
13 August 2011, 1819
I spent the evenings last week in designing the motor mount. I had a ¼” steel plate which I got when I bought the motor. It had the 4 holes for the motor and a big 30mm hole in the center for the motor’s shaft. It also had 2 more holes the previous owner planned to use for mounting on his own chassis.
1544

My intention was to use this plate and cut it to my requirements.
I designed two different plates. The first plate is designed for hand cutting that relies on a drill to make the motor shaft hole (and actually using the holes from the original plate.

1546
The second plate is essentially the same, other than the center hole which is much bigger and is matching the groove on the motor.

1547

I checked on http://www.bigbluesaw.com/ and the price for a hot-rolled ¼” steel machined to the plate’s specification is ~$100.
I decided to start with the hand cut one and if necessary machine a new one.
I started with a jigsaw with a Bosch high speed metal blade. This blade should be able to handle ¼” of steel. I cooled it with WD-40 and stopped every ½” or so.
1545
After around 5” (1/3 of the cut) and after I’ve burnt 3 blades, I went to home depot to find better blades of a better solution. Home depot only carried the same type of blade, but I’ve found a blade for the band saw I have. I didn’t think it will work, but I’ve got it anyway. So the second attempt is with a band saw.

1548
This attempt failed miserably after the band saw hardly scratched the metal plate.
I ended up using the good old $10 angle grinder from Harbor Freight tools with 4” cutting and grinding wheels.

1549

The results are pretty satisfactory for me. And after drilling the two extra holes (for mounting on the motorcycle, I’ve got the following.

(I will try to put it on the next post because the picture loader is giving me hell)

zohargolan
13 August 2011, 1848
I guess there is a limitation to the number of pictures in one post or to the total attachement size so here it is the hand made motor mount.
1550

Nuts & Volts
13 August 2011, 1928
Haha that is exactly what I did on my bike. Bandsaw cutting first then just used the harbor freight angle grinder. The grinder can't be beat for cutting, just have to spend a little extra time cleaning up the rough edges after and your good to go.

Nice mount, clean and simple. You can probably drill a bunch of holes in that steel as well. Some guys are only using 1/4" alum to hold that same motor with ease. Drilling holes could save you a pound or two, if you care :) I havent drilled and material off of my 1/4" steel mount cuz im lazy

zohargolan
13 August 2011, 2017
Haha that is exactly what I did on my bike. Bandsaw cutting first then just used the harbor freight angle grinder. The grinder can't be beat for cutting, just have to spend a little extra time cleaning up the rough edges after and your good to go.
Haha, Also I had to clean up myself, the grinding dusted the whole garage with this metal dust. I still have this dust stuck in my nose :p


Nice mount, clean and simple. You can probably drill a bunch of holes in that steel as well. Some guys are only using 1/4" alum to hold that same motor with ease. Drilling holes could save you a pound or two, if you care :) I havent drilled and material off of my 1/4" steel mount cuz im lazy
Good idea... I guess I am also lazy :)

zohargolan
20 August 2011, 1146
In the last week I was researching different batteries. I am planning to go with deep cycle SLA batteries 55AH for the alpha prototype and maybe in future versions migrate to a more powerful lithium based batteries. After plugging the numbers into the excel spread sheet and then using the calculated current with the battery specification sheets, I came up with the approximate speed/range table.

Speed Amp Range
30 35 30miles
35 45 26miles
40 55 23miles
45 70 16miles
50 85 13miles
55 105 11miles

This table does not taking into consideration the acceleration current but only the cruise speed current. Also it is only a rough estimation.
In order to be able to arrange the batteries on the motorcycle, I’ve created some battery mockup from scrap cardboard. The size is 9” X 5.5” X 8” which is the approximate size of the 22N battery.
1580
Then I tried different configurations on the motorcycle.
1581158215831584
I am still not sure of what configuration is the best yet but I would like to maintain a narrow body.
What you guys prefer?
Any other suggestions?

Zohar

zohargolan
22 August 2011, 2346
Guys

I need help in here :(

What is your take on the battery arrangement from above?

Allen_okc
23 August 2011, 0725
you may want to consider replacing the sub frame "belly" with a battery friendly mount configuration...

it requires tubing and welding - but it would be worth it in the long run...

there are a few fellows here that have photos of their set up...

ZoomSmith
23 August 2011, 0805
Zohar,

I think you can see what a problem really big batteries are for such a small bike. Your first option should be to consider another size of battery.

If you are hung up on the battery format I would say that your attached pics 1,2 & 4 are very unsafe. Option #3 has potential, but I would put three batteries across above the motor and then put one below in front of the motor, between the rails (relocate the cross brace).

-ZS

zohargolan
23 August 2011, 0849
Zohar,

I think you can see what a problem really big batteries are for such a small bike. Your first option should be to consider another size of battery.

If you are hung up on the battery format I would say that your attached pics 1,2 & 4 are very unsafe. Option #3 has potential, but I would put three batteries across above the motor and then put one below in front of the motor, between the rails (relocate the cross brace).

-ZS
Hi ZS,

This is actually a very interesting option.The width will be more than options 1,3,4 but less then option 2. It might still maintain narrow body. I will try to play with it.

Thank you,
Zohar

zohargolan
29 August 2011, 2154
Hi All,

After getting your recommendations, I've decided to cut the chassis and expand the belly. I came up with the solution below.
1601
I have enough space to put the four batteries and they are all located in a way that creates a low center of gravity.

See my build log at http://www.gol-tec.com/
The problem is that in the process I had to remove the foot brake. Is it possible to convert the foot brake to a left hand brake? otherwise I will have a hard time to relocate the foot brake.

Thank you,
Zohar
Website: http://www.gol-tec.com/
Build log: http://www.gol-tec.com/ev/build_log/

ZoomSmith
29 August 2011, 2215
. Is it possible to convert the foot brake to a left hand brake? otherwise I will have a hard time to relocate the foot brake.

Pretty sure EVcycle did exactly that on a few of his projects. Maybe he can point you to the page or fill in the details.

frodus
29 August 2011, 2217
sweet log!

didn't know you did embedded stuff, good to know.... might talk to you about some stuff later.

zohargolan
29 August 2011, 2225
sweet log!

didn't know you did embedded stuff, good to know.... might talk to you about some stuff later.

Thanks Travis,

Always open for new ideas ;)

EVcycle
30 August 2011, 0313
Pretty sure EVcycle did exactly that on a few of his projects. Maybe he can point you to the page or fill in the details.

We have converted all of our bikes to left hand brake. One was a cable rear brake and the rest were hydraulic.
It frees up some weight and you can mount your foot pegs anywhere that is comfortable.

If it is a cable deal just purchase a longer motorcycle (NOT bicycle) cable and use the clutch handle.

If you need a left handed brake master cylinder, there are a few that are on ebay that were for a hydraulic clutch or drag racing.
** make sure you get the "flow bolt" with the unit as they do not all have the same thread and pitch. **

Here are a few options

Left hand brake (http://www.cyclebuy.com/shopping/rekluse/info_pages/info_brakes.htm)

Ebay Left hand unit (http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Dragbike-KZ-GS-Magura-Left-Side-Master-Kawasaki-Suzuki-/380364759226?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item588f81a0ba#ht_500wt_1182)

zohargolan
30 August 2011, 0706
We have converted all of our bikes to left hand brake. One was a cable rear brake and the rest were hydraulic.
It frees up some weight and you can mount your foot pegs anywhere that is comfortable.

If it is a cable deal just purchase a longer motorcycle (NOT bicycle) cable and use the clutch handle.


It is a cable deal and this is exactly what I was planning to do. My only concern was that I will loose braking power and it will become a safety issue.

Zohar
Website: http://www.gol-tec.com/
build_log: http://www.gol-tec.com/ev/build_log/

Allen_okc
30 August 2011, 0706
If it is a cable deal just purchase a longer motorcycle (NOT bicycle) cable and use the clutch handle.

DARN !!! I hate when that happens...

EVcycle
30 August 2011, 0738
It is a cable deal and this is exactly what I was planning to do. My only concern was that I will loose braking power and it will become a safety issue.

I did not lose any braking power when I went to the hand cable setup. If anything it made it more manageable
as my hand could regulate the pressure better than my motorcycle booted foot.

EVcycle
30 August 2011, 0739
DARN !!! I hate when that happens...

You an funny guy!! :):):)

Allen_okc
30 August 2011, 0833
if you go with a cable for your rear brakes - these two items helped me to convert mine to a cable instead of a rod...

a cable clamp that fits in the eyelet of the brake drums arm...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Brake-Cable-Clamp-Triumph-Norton-BSA-Motorcycle-60-0638-/190491727045?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item2c5a3114c5

and of course you will need an adjuster with a tab added to the frame...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorcycle-Cable-Adjuster-8-5mm-Cable-End-8mm-Thread-/150648687017?pt=UK_Motorcycle_Parts&hash=item23135c89a9

just a suggestion...

zohargolan
30 August 2011, 1134
if you go with a cable for your rear brakes - these two items helped me to convert mine to a cable instead of a rod...

a cable clamp that fits in the eyelet of the brake drums arm...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Brake-Cable-Clamp-Triumph-Norton-BSA-Motorcycle-60-0638-/190491727045?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item2c5a3114c5

and of course you will need an adjuster with a tab added to the frame...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorcycle-Cable-Adjuster-8-5mm-Cable-End-8mm-Thread-/150648687017?pt=UK_Motorcycle_Parts&hash=item23135c89a9

just a suggestion...

Allen,
Very cool!

Thank you

zohargolan
30 August 2011, 2254
Allen,

you have any pictures of the setup?

zohargolan
02 September 2011, 0831
We have converted all of our bikes to left hand brake. One was a cable rear brake ...

Hi Ed,

Do you have a picture of the setup?
I am not sure how to mount the cable, as there was a rod before coming from the pedal.

podolefsky
02 September 2011, 1214
I had a left-hand brake, converted from the hydraulic clutch lever. It worked, but I switched back to the original foot brake and it is noticeably more powerful. Could be that my foot is stronger than my left hand, or that the piston is better matched.

That said, it worked fine. Main reason I switched is to use a cable clutch as regen brake.

If you do convert to left-hand brake, you'll probably want to rig a brake light switch to the lever.

zohargolan
02 September 2011, 1927
Hi Guys,

How do you mount the edge of the hand brake cable to the chassis?
Can you post pictures of that setup?

Really appreciate the help.

UCFdave
14 October 2011, 1532
To copy and paste from diy..

I'm resurrecting a bit of an old thread.. I'm actually in the process of restoring an SL175 for my father and have been having a heck of a time trying to find some specific pieces. Please let me know as to the status of the bike and available parts because I might be able to help differ some of the cost of the LiPo's that you're going to want for your bike.