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furyphoto
17 April 2013, 2301
Interesting Battery News today from the University of Illinois.

Quote from "I F@%$ing Love Science" on Facebook (you should follow if you don't already)

"Imagine a battery the size of the one in your cell phone with enough juice to jump-start a car. It's actually not too far-fetched. Scientists at the University of Illinois have been developing microbatteries. Only a few millimeters long, these batteries may pave the way for electronics to become smaller and thinner, while still providing enough energy to be highly effective. The best part: it recharges 1000 times faster than current batteries. Who said good things donít come in small packages?"

Report at Science Daily

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416151929.htm

jazclrint
18 April 2013, 0019
This tech would fix charge rate issues and allow for 300hp Leafs with no damage to the battery. Maybe even make them safer? But they won't pack as many kWh as an A123 cell, so range wouldn't be improved. Which is more important; range or charge time?

Hugues
18 April 2013, 0403
Also saw the post on Slashdot but it seems the gains would be more for small batteries i i got it right, hence the "micro" in the title,
but yeah, if we want to develop a micro bike, i guess it's cool.

EVcycle
18 April 2013, 0554
Maybe even make them safer? But they won't pack as many kWh as an A123 cell, so range wouldn't be improved. Which is more important; range or charge time?

Make them safer... I gather you speaking about the battery and not the LEAF.

Charge time or distance?

From the folks that OWN these cars, you will get a split of answers. I have no problem with charge time,
(better for theses batteries anyway), but some extra miles would be great.

For others it is the opposite. Getting both would be the obvious choice. :)

BaldBruce
18 April 2013, 1003
This tech would fix charge rate issues and allow for 300hp Leafs with no damage to the battery. Maybe even make them safer? But they won't pack as many kWh as an A123 cell, so range wouldn't be improved. Which is more important; range or charge time?

Here is the Ragone plot in the oriiginal paper. Yes they claim high power density, but not one of their prototypes came near ANY Lithium based battery energy density levels.
4339
Just always consider the source. University papers are to release information to the public. They are also used to generate excitement on that area of exploration to generate the funds necessary to continue that work. Jaded opinion I know, but based on working with many University "investigators" over the years.

furyphoto
19 April 2013, 0824
From that chart, it seems that A123 is the clear winner for now. I'll take one of these new fanged things in my phone though. Never know when you might have to jump start a car! :)