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Richard230
09 October 2010, 1453
An article in my newspaper written by the AP says that on October 1, Tesla announced a recall of 439 2010 model year Roadster 2.0 and 2.5 vehicles involving a mis-routed 12-volt auxiliary cable. The cable may be routed improperly and could result in the bare wire contacting the adjacent carbon fiber. This might cause a short-circuit and a fire in the front right headlamp area, according the NHTSA.

The recall fix involves checking the routing of the cable and installing a protective sleeve over the wire free of charge.

Lionstrike
11 October 2010, 1430
Yikes.

Who wants to buy an EV anyway?.... cheaper to build your own.

BaldBruce
11 October 2010, 1557
Yikes.

Who wants to buy an EV anyway?.... cheaper to build your own.

When you build one that does 0-60 in three seconds call me.....:)

DaveAK
11 October 2010, 1617
Hmmm. Should a manufacturer of electric vehicles have any unprotected bare wires in their products?

Richard230
11 October 2010, 1759
Hmmm. Should a manufacturer of electric vehicles have any unprotected bare wires in their products?

I got the impression from reading the article that the insulation on the wires can rub against some bodywork and that is what resulted in the potential for the bare wires shorting out against the adjacent carbon fiber. What I didn't know was the carbon fiber was conductive.

billmi
12 October 2010, 0618
Hmmm. Should a manufacturer of electric vehicles have any unprotected bare wires in their products?

Probably not, but in a system as complex as an automobile, it's not uncommon for small problems like this to go undiscovered until the vehicles have been on the road a while. It doesn't mean the wires have no protection - it means that they've discovered that the protection that is there might not be adequate.

Recalls like this happen all the time with the big auto makers. When my '91 Jeep Wrangler was a couple of years old it had a recall to add a protective pad between the chassis and the front brake line, because that the line could rub there and cause a leak. Chrysler didn't anticipate it from the design, and it wasn't a problem in their test vehicles. The only way it was discovered was after tens or hundreds of thousands were out there and had been driven for tens if not hundreds of thousands of miles - a very few developed a problem - so they fixed it.