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View Full Version : The "Juice Cafe" Racer. From start to Ton up! ( a dead guy and a New bike )



EVcycle
07 January 2011, 1822
There were apparently some issues with the previous owner of the first
frame I was going to use....he was dead so the title was in "Limbo".
(Long story, but a happy ending for all concerned)

So the person who sold me the first frame gave me money back and I now have a 1979 CB750.....F, (as is Super Sport) with a clear title. :)

This motorcycle is only one year newer, but is far superior to what I was starting with before. The frame is the same as before, but 2" longer. It has the Super Sport racing rims and new tires. Now I have to pull another motor, but it will be well worth it.

The bike itself is 50 Lbs lighter than the 78 version. It has disk brakes all around and more parts to sell off.

I was going to used some of the parts from the original "Orange Juice" bike but now, no need to do that.

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=714&d=1294449316

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=715&d=1294449318

Now I have to figure out what to do with the original Juiced bike..... :)

Richard230
07 January 2011, 1858
I used to have a 1979 CB750. It came with FVQ (fade very quickly) shocks and used a plastic swing-arm bearing. Needless to say it tended to weave when going around corners. I think that there are replacement needle bearings available for the swing-arm, new shocks are a necessity and it wouldn't hurt to replace the ball bearings in the steering head, either. I sold the bike and bought a Kawasaki 305 Ninja (the one with a rubber belt rear drive made by "Bando"). It handled a lot better than the Honda. The lighter weight and single-shock rear suspension helped.

EVcycle
07 January 2011, 1909
Thanks for the info Richard!

I have the upgrade steering kit on the shelf. The previous owner had supposedly done some work to the bike in the past few years.
I will not really really know what was done until I tear it down this weekend. It is a heavy bike in the ICE form. I am hoping it will ride
better in its new lighter weight life.

More photos to come.

cycleguy
07 January 2011, 1923
Good luck on the build Ed. Looking forward to watching your progress.

EVcycle
08 January 2011, 1333
How much can we fit part two?

Well it is now stripped of all the ICE stuff and we have even more room than the 1978 version.

It fits 4 boxes with ease and maybe even 5 boxes -30s5p - (Woooo hooo) with a bit of trimming.

I will not be able to start the welding of the box supports until the actual motor arrives. I will start lowering the bike and get the brakes and such sorted out.

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=716&d=1294517810

More later!

EVcycle
29 January 2011, 1746
We now have ....Brakes! I know some of you have started some of the mid-late 70's bikes. I had forgotten how much fun
it was to stop the bike and find the brake would not release....

Normally it would be a collapsed brake line, but in this case, it was sticky slave cylinders and collapsed lines.

I spent all of Saturday rebuilding the cylinders and installing the new steel braided brake lines. Fun Stuff.

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=779&d=1296348125

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=780&d=1296348130

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=781&d=1296348135

ZoomSmith
29 January 2011, 2001
Looking good Ed. What's the advantage of the left hand rear brake setup?

EVcycle
30 January 2011, 0400
Thanks. We can take off from 6 to 9 pounds of useless weight on the bike. It also gives me more flexibility to move the foot pegs anywhere and make the bike more comfortable. Foot position for me, especially on a sport bike, is important.

larryrose11
30 January 2011, 0609
Ed,
Did you consider putting the motor in the back triangle under the seat, and making a counter shaft setup?
It would help with the packaging, chain alignment and chain tension. not to mension center of mass.
You could put the shaft next to the swing arm pivot. You can weld, so the hard part would be the lining it all up.
It also chain have the advantage of having 2 ratios, motor to counter shaft, counter shaft to wheel. Chain wont be so close to the dirt. Something like a 15 on the motor, 25 & 15 on the counter, and the origional 45 (guess) rear would be a ratio of 5:1. It would make it run quieter as well. The efficiency hit could easily be made up by making room an addition battery box, 6 total!

larryrose11
30 January 2011, 0610
Ed,
Did you consider... (report from above. hit the send 2x)

EVcycle
30 January 2011, 0800
Thanks for the suggestion and an interesting idea. For this project it would be to complicated, adds resistance and weight.
It would also raise the center of mass, not lower it, since the motor is the heaviest part.
Quieter?

I will keep it simple for now. (just like me!) :)

larryrose11
30 January 2011, 0851
Quieter?

The idea is to get away from the 12/13 size sprockets. That is why I suggested 15 on the motor, 25 & 15 on the counter, and the original 45 (guess) rear

EVcycle
30 January 2011, 1324
The idea is to get away from the 12/13 size sprockets. That is why I suggested 15 on the motor, 25 & 15 on the counter, and the original 45 (guess) rear

Actually the 12 is fairly quiet, especially with the 420 chain. It only got noisy with the 10 or 11 tooth. I mainly get wind noise after 45 MPH. anyway.

EVcycle
30 January 2011, 1327
And now we have a Speedometer!


http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=782&d=1296419177

jpanichella
30 January 2011, 1335
Well that's pretty damn cool. Are you just using that as a speedo and run it with a cycle analyst?

EVcycle
30 January 2011, 1343
It is a GARMIN GPS unit. It will be mounted there permanently in a water proof case.
It was on sale at Best buy and cheaper, lighter and most likely
more accurate than the alternatives. (Plus no wiring!!!) :)


I will have a volt meter for my "El Cheapo" BMS system. (plus a few Cell Log 8S units for good measure) :)

billmi
30 January 2011, 1443
That looks great, Ed!

EVcycle
05 February 2011, 1633
The hardest part (for me anyway) is the motor mount which was completed today. This one was took a little more "figgering"
as the engine compartment is much larger so getting it all lined up and strong took a bit longer.
The larger compartment will be the best part for the batteries though!!


More later



Note to Self: Put glove back on before grabbing hot welded parts..... :(

EVcycle
06 February 2011, 1525
Battery Racks were completed today.

Now waiting on parts. I will start wiring up things this week.....I hope.

EVcycle
06 February 2011, 1546
May not look like much was done, and that the way I like it. The very bottom battery rack is a bolt in so if I
opt to run only 3 boxes or need to change it to a different size, it will be a lot easier.

This bike will get a full tear down once assembled/tested, sand blasted and then powder coat the frame....at least that is the plan. The black battery boxes are old empty ones.

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=819&d=1297032152

teddillard
07 February 2011, 0517
ruh roh! Better get my butt going! :D

Looks awesome Ed, I see why you were toying with the idea of cutting the upper frame braces now. On the sandblasting after preliminary assembly? Yeah, I had that plan on the VF500F, too... but it was more fun to ride it ugly! But I'm sure you have enough electric vehicles to keep you happy while you do that. Great progress!

EVcycle
07 February 2011, 0644
I could fit mucho more battereis if I could do a little cutting...... :)

teddillard
07 February 2011, 0809
I could fit mucho more battereis if I could do a little cutting...... :)

step awaaaayyy from the sawzall, sir, and keep your hands where we can see 'em. :O

EVcycle
07 February 2011, 1053
Wirrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Muhahaha!!!





LOL

sparky_mark
07 February 2011, 1136
Don't know if you'd planned on adding a fairing, but might I suggest fitting a replica fairing to look like this bike (http://www.m3racing.com/garagesale/factory_750.html). I'm no expert, but your frame should be about the right size to fit a replica Honda CR750 seat, tank, and fairing. And when you've done it, I'll be bloody jealous as I wanted to be the first to make an electric CR750 replica. :) Would have used an Enertrac wheel......

EVcycle
07 February 2011, 1207
Funny you should mention that as I just got word that the fairing/seat/tank I ordered in Dec has been shipped.
This is what the bike should look like without all the ICE stuff.

http://www.elmoto.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=821&d=1297105514

teddillard
07 February 2011, 1244
LOVES it!!!

Skeezmour
07 February 2011, 1510
That is COOL!

EVcycle
08 February 2011, 1348
Rear Sprockets ( I always order two just in case and saves on shipping)
came in today, and yes they are for a 420 chain.

Saves 2 pounds off the bike as well as rotating weight. :)

ZoomSmith
08 February 2011, 1354
Do you run a 420 chain on the Drag bike? If so, how's it holding up?

BTW, this looks like a killer build. I love classic cafe look.

EVcycle
08 February 2011, 1404
Do you run a 420 chain on the Drag bike? If so, how's it holding up?

BTW, this looks like a killer build. I love classic cafe look.

Thanks,

The Drag bike had a 530 chain. This one will be for speed, not so much for Drag racing torque. The Cruiser (Orange Juiced) has the 420 and it still looks new.
It is a Renthal R1 Works. The average tensile strength for this 420 chain is 4496 lbf. Not to shabby! :)

EVcycle
09 February 2011, 1812
Extra motor gears and precharge resistor on the way.

The motor was shipped today...... More POWER!!! :)

soyachips
24 February 2011, 0527
Very nice work Ed. I've been thinking about making an electric cafe racer lately. If I could afford it I'd love to use one of these:

http://www.shelbynyc.com/nycnorton/Rusty2.JPG

It's a Norton featherbed frame which apparently revolutionised frame design when it came out. It's meant to be very stiff and the space inside the frame would be very easy to work with.

jpanichella
24 February 2011, 0717
Very nice work Ed. I've been thinking about making an electric cafe racer lately. If I could afford it I'd love to use one of these:

http://www.shelbynyc.com/nycnorton/Rusty2.JPG

It's a Norton featherbed frame which apparently revolutionised frame design when it came out. It's meant to be very stiff and the space inside the frame would be very easy to work with.

Wow that's perfect. I want that.

EVcycle
24 February 2011, 0915
Excellent!

The only issue I see is if you use lead batteries and keep the Drum brakes.

Now you just need to find one in good shape at a good price :O

Coninsan
24 February 2011, 1022
Excellent!

The only issue I see is if you use lead batteries and keep the Drum brakes.

Now you just need to find one in good shape at a good price :O

The Featherbed takes a wide range of front and rear forks, so don't worry, most frames that go on sale is just that, a frame, no forks.

But getting hold of one is another matter entirely. Most original frames are being used for Triton projects or have been chopped and modified beyond recognition.
Some original do pop up from time to time but usually, depending on condition ofcourse, they go for between $750 to $1500.

But there are some companies out there who will build a replica frame for you, but it costs.. But then again when are you gonna find a frame that will fit a 11.5Kw pack and a AC-20 + controller without a hitch? :)

fat-tony
09 March 2011, 0508
Have a look on the UK bike sites and classic bike mags. I'm more than happy to help out with shipping if you find one. They are getting rarer to find, loads of folks building childhood dream bikes.