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Thread: Finding High Power Lithium-ion battery Chargers

              
   
   
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    Finding High Power Lithium-ion battery Chargers

    Hi all, I am trying to look for a lithium ion battery charger that will be able to charge my 100V nominal LMO lithium-ion battery safely and quickly. The battery is for an electric motorcycle conversion I am building, and I have been looking on the internet to see what other E-motorcycles have used, and I am getting a bit confused by some solutions I have seen online which use a constant DC output which is not correct when charging a lithium ion battery chemistry.

    Does anyone have any experience in this, or know where I can find high power (2-3kW) chargers for my 100V pack? Any help is appreciated!

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    Empulse R #24 frodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zotto View Post
    Hi all, I am trying to look for a lithium ion battery charger that will be able to charge my 100V nominal LMO lithium-ion battery safely and quickly. The battery is for an electric motorcycle conversion I am building, and I have been looking on the internet to see what other E-motorcycles have used, and I am getting a bit confused by some solutions I have seen online which use a constant DC output which is not correct when charging a lithium ion battery chemistry.

    Does anyone have any experience in this, or know where I can find high power (2-3kW) chargers for my 100V pack? Any help is appreciated!
    For lithium, you want CC then CV. They go constant current as the voltage of the pack raises to a certain point, then CV and the current tapers off and eventually stops.

    There's Elcon/TCChargers, also there is a crowdsourcing of the Supercharger from Brandon as an option too. Might talk to him about what you need.

    I have some 96V chargers that would fit your need, but they're 1000W.

    What size pack are you building? 100V but how many Ah?

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    100V at 66Ah, sorry forgot to mention that haha. We are looking for something that can charge our battery in 3-4 hours. 1000W isn't bad but non-ideal. Hmm, sorry I am new to the forum, who is Brandon?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zotto View Post
    ...a constant DC output, which is not correct when charging a lithium ion battery chemistry.
    What makes you think that?
    Any DC power supply which is clamped to the pack Vmax in voltage terms (so in your case about 110-113V) , and has current limit enforcement built in, will bulk charge a Lithium pack just fine.
    That being said, you really should be more concerned with the BMS integration of your charging solution (in which case the charger capabilities become a function of whatever the BMS tells it) - or are you planning on running without one? (no judgement, there's nothing wrong with running without a BMS as long as you know how to manually maintain your pack and are diligent enough to do so).
    Last edited by Spoonman; 11 December 2018 at 0911.

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    Hmm can you explain how the DC power supply clamped to Vmax would work in that case, I thought the supply voltage was supposed to float to whatever the current source from the power supply set it to, then eventually when the pack reaches ~4.2V/cell the constant voltage took over.

    I am designing my own BMS actually! This is for our senior design at school, the BMS design is nearly done, and should hopefully work, but I well be doing a ton of testing to ensure that it does.

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    Empulse R #24 frodus's Avatar
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    Most, if not all, chargers we work with these days are CC/CV with a setpoint. for a 6-7kWh pack, a 1000W charger would take about 6-7 hours. You can double them up and do it in half. Just depends on your budget. Do you have thoughts on budget?

    I can get you TCChargers if you want, just don't list them on my site.

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    Probably in the $500 range for charging solution.

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    I’m working with Zotto on this project. I was looking at building out a charger using Elteck flat packs or similar, but where we’re running into confusion is the constant current distinction. Is it appropriate to use a power supply like the flat packs stacked in series and set to a voltage set point to charge for the CC portion of the charge cycle? We were getting confused on whether the voltage of the charger is supposed to match with the cell voltage during the CC charge cycle.

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    Empulse R #24 frodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhaggerty View Post
    Im working with Zotto on this project. I was looking at building out a charger using Elteck flat packs or similar, but where were running into confusion is the constant current distinction. Is it appropriate to use a power supply like the flat packs stacked in series and set to a voltage set point to charge for the CC portion of the charge cycle? We were getting confused on whether the voltage of the charger is supposed to match with the cell voltage during the CC charge cycle.
    Set the charger output voltages that of the final voltage you want. The power supply voltage will be that of the battery, so it'll start out low, and since there's a voltage difference between what the charger is set to, and the battery voltage, current will flow. Basically, the chargers will put out current at CC until they reach the voltage setpoint, and then switch to CV, and the current will naturally taper towards 0A.

    There's the $500 supercharger Brandon is doing, might talk to him:
    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/d...uction/x/16882

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    Quote Originally Posted by frodus View Post
    Set the charger output voltages that of the final voltage you want. The power supply voltage will be that of the battery, so it'll start out low, and since there's a voltage difference between what the charger is set to, and the battery voltage, current will flow. Basically, the chargers will put out current at CC until they reach the voltage setpoint, and then switch to CV, and the current will naturally taper towards 0A.

    There's the $500 supercharger Brandon is doing, might talk to him:
    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/d...uction/x/16882

    Hmm, that does make sense! When you say "set" these values, is it done manually, or over an I2C or CANbus? I am assuming its different for each charger solution, but I have no interest in implementing a CANbus for our electrical system, so I was hoping I could find a manual or I2C driven charger.

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