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Thread: Motorcycle Safety: Sitting Down Now

              
   
   
  1. #11
    Senior Member
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    I just found a KTM commercial that gives you a good idea how they think you should ride on public streets:

    http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/Ne..._/R-EPI-141979
    Richard - Current bikes: 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield 500, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

  2. #12
    teddillard
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    Yeah. And I'm getting **** for being strident. Don't even get me started on the manufacturers, as far back as the early 80s. Totally irresponsible.

    I wonder what would happen if you could actually tie an ad like that to a few dead teenagers. Think it would change anything?

  3. #13
    Senior Member jonescg's Avatar
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    You're not sitting down, Ted.

  4. #14
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    I remember reading a piece in Fast Bikes magazine soon after I learnt to ride. It was talking about how all these random accidents always appeared to happen to the same people. They may not have ben at fault in these incidents but they were riding in a way that put them in a position that should something go wrong they would be in the firing line.

    There's a simple answer; training, training & more training.

    When I was just riding in the advanced group at track days I thought I was fast. I did a whole bunch of road training with the Police and the local 'Institute of Advanced Motorcyclists'. I learnt a massive amount and was faster and safer on the road and much faster on the track.

    Then I did a whole bunch of California SuperBike School (CSS) days and learnt a load more. I even did some courses several times and just kept learning. Then I started racing and kept doing the CSS days and kept improving.

    When I stopped racing and started a race team I was working with guys with loads more talent who were already faster than I would ever be. I still managed to teach them new stuff and they got even faster.

    You can learn from the guy teaching body positioning, you can learn (a lot) from the guy teaching observation drill and you can learn from the old slow guy who has listened and analysed everything anyone with any skill has ever said.

    I went from a medium paced road rider getting left behind by all all his friends to the guy that would be miles ahead waiting for them yet I was still much safer at that speed than when I was riding more slowly.

    Never stop learning and never discount the value of training.

  5. #15
    teddillard
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonescg View Post
    You're not sitting down, Ted.


    Last edited by teddillard; 04 October 2013 at 0305.

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