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Thread: Reference guide for donor bikes?

              
   
   
  1. #11
    Seņor Member podolefsky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EV_Scoot View Post
    Bikes that definitely have frames that seem made to be converted
    Bikes that you may think are ideal, but once you crack them open, there's no room for anything or at least anything worth while.
    Bikes that maybe good if it wasn't for the lack of parts etc
    Getting to the questions in the OP. I can throw in my experience with the '93 GSX-R 1100. 93-95, 600, 750, and 1100 have basically the same frame.

    - It seems made for the parts I put in it (AC-20, GBS 72V, 60Ah pack). It took some time and patience, but once I figured it out everything just seemed to fall into place.
    - Lots of room. Actually room for about 8 kWh of EIG or Kokam (if I could afford it).
    - Great supply of parts new and used. Lots of parts fit across years, all the way into the 2000's. I have an '01 rear shock that's a significant upgrade over the '93.
    - Noah Podolefsky -
    The GSX-E

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  3. #12
    Senior Member EV_Scoot's Avatar
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    Cheers Noah. That helps.

  4. #13
    Senior Member Brutus's Avatar
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    Honda 954/929 and F4/F4i have tons of "swappable" parts as does most everything in the Suzuki GSXR line up from 2000 to present day bikes. A good way to see cost of getting a potential roller is to search ebay for the bike you have in mind, if there are a ton of parts for sale there then you will know how hard it will be to keep your project on budget and not get hit with a part that is pretty much unobtainium.

    On the 929/954 the pivot for the swingarm is not part of the main frame so it might lend itself to more options for a custom frame later or possibly more flexibility for motor and battery packaging. With the Suzuki GSXR option the parts will be slightly more expensive, the frame incorporates the swingarm pivot and the aftermarket is endless from fairings to pretty nut and bolt kits and everything in between.

  5. #14
    Senior Member jonescg's Avatar
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    If you want a wheelbarrow of a donor bike, get a 2000-2004 GSXR1000, or a 2007-2008 GSXR1000. Don't get a K5 or K6. Bloody things were shortened significantly and the under tank space was tiny.

  6. #15
    Senior Member EV_Scoot's Avatar
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    Thanks Brutus and jonescg.

    Yeah I like the GSXR's. They're popular and as such come at a price. I've seen some 80's ones going way past my spend for it's condition.

    Food for thought though.

  7. #16
    Senior Member EV_Scoot's Avatar
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    I think I'd like to go with a Suzuki GS500 ( As late as model as I can get ) or a Kawasaki ZZR (mid 90's onward )

    I think the GS500 is a good commuter bike. Also looking at late 90's Suzuki GS250F ( Accross )
    Last edited by EV_Scoot; 18 November 2013 at 1618.

  8. #17
    Senior Member jonescg's Avatar
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    I used to own a GS500 - great bike and plenty of room for all your stuff. It was a bit oversized and underpowered, so an electrification would be a vast improvement.

    DSCN0187.jpg

  9. #18
    Junior Member GPZ500E's Avatar
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    I am currently converting a Kawasaki GPZ500S (EX500) and it seems to have a good amount of room for batteries, although I am considering making some slimline panniers to increase capacity. I think that there are a couple of considerations when buying a donor bike. Price$$$, what you intend to use it for (commuter/tourer), the bigger the bike the bigger the batteries that can be used and what your local registration requirements are. The newer the bike the happier the engineer will be to approve your efforts. The less that you alter the frame, braking and overall weight the easier it would be to register.

  10. #19
    Senior Member EV_Scoot's Avatar
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    Nice GPZ,
    Price for sure. Yeah, I feel that the better condition and newer it is, will be easier to convince the engineer just like you said. I don't want anything older than 92.

    Have seen some late model bikes, but as I have to sell my scoot first, I always lose out. I need to clean up the scoot which requires some money that I don't have.

  11. #20
    Junior Member GPZ500E's Avatar
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    I ordered the batteries today as I decided to go 48v rather than 72v. luckily the motor and controller will work at both voltages MEO709 motor and Alltrax 7245 controller.
    I made the decision so that I could fit in greater capacity, 100ah rather than 60ah. What I have seen on Youtube 48v should still give me a decent power and range. [COLOR="#FF0000"]The things you learn along the way, Buy the biggest bike that you can afford.

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