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Thread: Desktop CNC anyone?

              
   
   
  1. #11
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    Hi
    very nice results, especially considering a wobbly cnc like the shapeoko.
    regarding toolpath i can highly recomend using trochiodal milling (read up on it) for milling aluminium or steel.
    The way it works, its far less demanding on rigidity of ones cnc so it is especially good for hobby/ desktop cnc milling.
    Its a lot faster and better for tool lasting on top.
    My cnc is not a desktop (appart form general moving gantry desingn) but a 150 kg cnc, still i use the trochiodal approach as much as i can, the results just speak for it.

    Rhino plus the cam plugin is what i use but the very cheap ESTL- cam also includes it. (and you can try that for free..).

    Greets

    flo

  2. #12
    I should be working! furyphoto's Avatar
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    Thanks, I have a Shapeoko3, which, while not as rigid as a 150KG machine, is actually fairly sturdy for a <> $1000 home CNC. I'm not doing production parts, so I can run it conservatively to get decent cuts. It's accuracy has been impressive (for my needs at least). I have dabbled a bit with Fusion 360, but haven't' had the time to get into it enough to get myself through a project including trochoidal milling. Its next on the list after having figured out some effective speeds & feeds for 6061 on this machine.
    I have been using the Carbide Create software. It might be great for making simple 2D cuts of wooden signs and stuff, but it is definitely clunky for complicated CAM and things like finishing paths (requires extra geometry). I'm sure once I get my head around F360, I will never look back.
    -Andrew

    http://www.andrewdoran.com
    mail(at)andrewdoran.com

    My ElMoto Project "Electric Hurricane" - 1987 Honda CBR600 F1: Check out my Build ALBUM
    My ICE Cafe Racer Project "My Precious" - 1983 Honda CM400 Classic

  3. #13
    Senior Member Ted Dillard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by furyphoto View Post
    .. I have spent a good chunk of time this week dialing in settings for cutting aluminum on my Shapeoko, ...
    Care to share your settings?

    We're running a Shapeoko3 as well, I love that li'l thang.
    Power in Flux: The History of Electric Motorcycles
    www.powerinflux.com

  4. #14
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    Hi
    there was no intention to say anything against your machine or even harm feelings..in the world of cnc even mine is considered a total wobbly thing. Anything weighting under a ton is considered a toy.
    I say it again:
    Have a look at ESTL cam. it is simply to use, comes with a full set of tutorials on yt, is cheap and free to use at first.

    Thing is - to me - using a trochiodal cutting path does not make your project more complex in any way, all of it is just toolpath created by the cam without you doing anything.
    BUT as it is (while intimidating when watching first time) far less demanding on your mill-bits and machine you will get excellent results without going through the trouble of finding best speeds for your particular machine. Think of it as simply slicing or shaving off the material sideways (as in a finishing operation), so ESPECIALLY for less rigid machine designs it is far less demanding than otherwise and thus easier to get good results.
    Imagine sticking a knife dead straight into the wood, trying to halve it, opposed to shaving off from one side... which will be more demanding on all parameters (strength of blade, your own, speed of cut, debth of cut)?

    A Right click on any button will open a explenation of what will happen... so you do not even have to memorise ...

    I do create most pockets , cutouts and final outline with it, leaving more or less just drilling and finishing to conventional mill operation.
    Saves time, money on bits, and as said there is no additional thing for you to do or learn...

    At least , watch the tutorial vids of christian (developer) on yt... there is nothing to loose for you...

    greets

    flo

  5. #15
    I should be working! furyphoto's Avatar
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    Hey Ted,
    This is in BETA, so take it easy (especially with the plunge rates!) You'll be only the 2nd person I've sent it to. Please provide feedback if you have ideas!...

    http://andrewdoran.com/_Services/dow...calculator.zip


    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Dillard View Post
    Care to share your settings?

    We're running a Shapeoko3 as well, I love that li'l thang.
    -Andrew

    http://www.andrewdoran.com
    mail(at)andrewdoran.com

    My ElMoto Project "Electric Hurricane" - 1987 Honda CBR600 F1: Check out my Build ALBUM
    My ICE Cafe Racer Project "My Precious" - 1983 Honda CM400 Classic

  6. #16
    I should be working! furyphoto's Avatar
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    No offence taken. I know in the world of machining that this is a 'toy'. It's just that folks tend to underestimate what you can do with a wobbly machine if you learn to work within it's limits.
    Checkout https://www.instagram.com/vince.fab/ to see someone who is really pushing this little machine.

    Quote Originally Posted by flo View Post
    Hi
    there was no intention to say anything against your machine or even harm feelings..in the world of cnc even mine is considered a total wobbly thing. Anything weighting under a ton is considered a toy.
    -Andrew

    http://www.andrewdoran.com
    mail(at)andrewdoran.com

    My ElMoto Project "Electric Hurricane" - 1987 Honda CBR600 F1: Check out my Build ALBUM
    My ICE Cafe Racer Project "My Precious" - 1983 Honda CM400 Classic

  7. #17
    I should be working! furyphoto's Avatar
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    Hot off the press, new swing-arm suspension mounting brackets:


    Fixturing (I had already cut these brackets with an angle grinder before I owned the CNC, so really I am just fancying them up)


    Using masking tape and CA (superglue) to hold the blanks in place.


    First side milling complete.


    Milling the second side.



    Finished Parts, ready for welding onto the swing-arm.
    -Andrew

    http://www.andrewdoran.com
    mail(at)andrewdoran.com

    My ElMoto Project "Electric Hurricane" - 1987 Honda CBR600 F1: Check out my Build ALBUM
    My ICE Cafe Racer Project "My Precious" - 1983 Honda CM400 Classic

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  9. #18
    Senior Member Ted Dillard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by furyphoto View Post
    Hey Ted,
    This is in BETA, so take it easy (especially with the plunge rates!) You'll be only the 2nd person I've sent it to. Please provide feedback if you have ideas!...

    http://andrewdoran.com/_Services/dow...calculator.zip
    Fantastic, I'll give it a shot. We have a perfect project for it.
    Power in Flux: The History of Electric Motorcycles
    www.powerinflux.com

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