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Thread: BMW i3 pack build?

              
   
   
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    Senior Member Spaceweasel's Avatar
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    BMW i3 pack build?

    Has anyone seen a pack build from BMW i3 cells? There seems to be a dearth of info, but packs are downright cheap (~$1400 for a salvage 22kWh pack).

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    All I know about BMW i3 cells are that three of their modules will be used on the C-Evolution scooter to be introduced into the California market in a few months. My BMW dealer is not at all sure that they will sell very many. (They haven't sold very many of BMW's $10-11,000 IC scooters during the past few years.) The C-Evolution is going to be priced at around $14,000 and (considering how well designed and built the scooter is) I bet BMW will be loosing thousands of dollars on every sale.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield 500, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

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    Senior Member Spaceweasel's Avatar
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    Three of the same modules from the i3? That would be interesting. It looks like the modules are 45V each, making for a 135V scooter if they wired them in series like in the i3. From what I read, the cells come in three sizes 60, 90, and (soon) 124ah. If they split them into a parallel set up, that could be up to 248ah at 67V.

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    Senior Member Spaceweasel's Avatar
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    I agree that the modules look too big for use in a scooter/motorcycle, but the module set up might make them attractive for a car conversion. Any information on the actual dimensions of the individual modules? I haven't seen any.

    Pictures of the pack next to the car show it fitting almost entirely between the wheels. the wheelbase is 101", the wheels themselves are 19". That leaves 6'8" of space. Round off for the bit at the end (charger? BMS?) and you have 6ish feet for 4 modules, or 18". The width of the i3 is 69", but there is quite a bit of structural space on each side of the car, so figure something less than 4.5'. Two modules widthwise means 27". Maybe 10" high, just visually estimated? I think 18"x27"x10" seems a bit large, but I don't think its bigger than that.

    This video has a better look, and talks about being able to easily replace a cell at 1:00 in. But I think they are interchanging cell and module terminology.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ9UpLkVJlo

    I estimated the module voltage by dividing the number of cells into their stated voltage. From the pics it looks like the whole pack is set up as a series of 96 cells divided into 8 modules. The assembly video shows each module being assembled from two stacks of 6 cells, but there is reference in some of the literature to industrial adhesive securing the cells in the modules.

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    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    I think they have an awesome concept to have interchangeable battery tray chassis. They can design one stressed chassis batt tray and use it in any of the different models of vehicle they want to. BMW also is aware of the fact that the batteries have a much longer life after their use in an electric vehicle. Thats real good news for us DIY'ers. I cant wait to get my hands on a 124ahr 90 volt pack.
    As a side thought.... if a battery pack improves every 2 to 4 years, then a top of the line sports coupe could get a new life with a new improved batt pack while the old ones get repurposed. The batteries still have great value because they can have an easy 10 years of life left in them. That means upgrades wont cost as much as you might think. BMW can make battery upgrades more affordable by letting their owners sell the old ones on an open market. Its like cattle auctions... you get what the market is offering for your batteries at the time you need or want new ones. This also makes the rest of the car that much more important to design and engineer to last longer. Other then seats and dash electronics, the car itself can be made to last someone's lifetime. It could be the last or only car that you ever need to buy. What a concept!!
    Last edited by Stevo; 12 August 2017 at 0907.
    Original build: http://vorworxemc.wix.com/vorworx
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4

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    Senior Member Spaceweasel's Avatar
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    Senior Member Spaceweasel's Avatar
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    Holy cow it was difficult to find info about the cells. http://pushevs.com/2017/02/20/detail...-battery-cell/

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