Power in Flux
Likes Likes:  4
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: 2004 Kawasaki ex500

              
   
   
  1. #11
    Senior Member Ted Dillard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Duck-Stew View Post
    As a suggestion: try if possible to opt for sprockets with odd number of teeth. They last longer as the inside plate of the chain will hit every spot between the teeth instead of every other one. They also run a little quieter.
    wuuuuuut?

    ...step away from the eggnog, sir, and keep your hands where we can see 'em.
    Power in Flux: The History of Electric Motorcycles
    www.powerinflux.com

  2. Likes Stevo liked this post
  3. #12
    Member Duck-Stew's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    ABQ, NM
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Think about it Ted...
    '10 Zero S project

  4. #13
    Senior Member Ted Dillard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like


    I've done a lot more than think about it, sir.

    Regarding chain life and sprocket teeth, none other than the magnificent Sheldon Brown: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chain-life.html

    ...however, if you really want to get more life out of a chain, his piece on maintenance is far more enlightening: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

    Yeah, ol' Sheldon is talking bicycles, but chain drives are chain drives. The point being, there's a heck of a lot more to worry about than how many teeth your sprocket has.

    Let's get back to the thread, now...
    Last edited by Ted Dillard; 28 December 2017 at 1341.
    Power in Flux: The History of Electric Motorcycles
    www.powerinflux.com

  5. Likes Duck-Stew, T Rush liked this post
  6. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like


    I haven't posted in a while, but I have been busy. I bought a rear 60 tooth sprocket from sprocket specialists for 520 chain before anyone had replied about proper chain sizing. I also got a front 14 tooth sprocket from Mcmaster carr, but it is too thick. I think I will have to grind off some excess thickness. I already tried turning the thickness down on my lathe, but the sprocket was harder than the tools on this very old and cheap lathe.

    I tore down and re-assembled the entire bike and I'm glad I did so because the entire rear suspension was only finger tight. I ensured every nut had the correct torque on re-assembly. I painted the plastics and stripped away most of the electrical system, leaving only the necessary 12V system to run the lights, gauges, and horn. I disassembled the tachometer, laser cut a new backplate and reverse engineered the signalling frequency to drive it. For anyone else who may be interested, the tachometer takes a 5V PWM signal (50% duty cycle, 0-~375 Hz) at a higher amperage than a microcontroller can deliver on its own. I ended up developing an arduino prototype board that will eventually interface with my Honeywell CSLA2EL hall effect linear current sensor to give an accurate estimate of current draw while riding.

    I got my batteries from Hybridautocenter today and crudely assembled them into a pack. I think I am going to try to remove some of the protruding metal pieces from some of the batteries and add thick leather washers between each battery so that the bulge on some of these batteries do not have to touch (see pictures). I have no idea how to go about removing those metal bits. Luckily, HAC also shipped the batteries with the wires necessary to connect a BMS. I haven't figured out my BMS solution yet, but I will connect the wires anyway as a future upgrade.

    I expect to receive the rest of my parts tomorrow except for my charger and DC/DC converter which should come later in the month.

    Right now I have to figure out how to securely mount the batteries in the bike. They just barely fit between the lower two bars, but I need to grind off some factory welds first.

  7. #15
    Member Nicman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Jackonsville, FL
    Posts
    77
    Post Thanks / Like
    If you got Nissan Leaf batteries make sure each cell is at a nominal voltage of ~7.6v. If they all are, and you wire them in series for your total pack voltage you may not need a BMS. I am not running one and my cells are staying very well balanced. My charger charges to 90.2v then shuts off. I havenít had any problems. Although Iím still pretty new to the scene.

    I hear you about the thickness of the sprocket. I had to buy a 530 chain and then it fit my sprocket perfectly.
    Look forward to seeing your progress.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #16
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Behind the Redwood Curtain- REDWOOD ORIGINAL!!
    Posts
    544
    Post Thanks / Like
    The quickest and cheapest way to grind those sprockets down is with a 4 1/2" angle grinder with a metal cut-off disc...and a steady hand. I've done a bunch and they all work perfect. I'm going to try and find a crossover sprocket match that will fit the 7/8" Motenergy motor shafts and take one of the ones I cut with the crossover to my local machinest to see if he can make a cool adapter. That's what we need.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: http://elmoto.net/showthread.php?t=4354

  9. #17
    Senior Member T Rush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Iowa City, IA. USA
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like
    I've got one of those EX 500R Ninjas(still ICE)

    ...I was glad to see you still had the head light and top/front fairing, as those all get smashed and can be hard/expensive to replace

    one of the most important things you have to do with these motorcycles is to upgrade the front suspension especially if you add any more weight to the bike and/or you weigh more than 120lbs yourself....you have to change the springs in the fork tubes to something stiffer!

    I think my 1999 Ninja only has 7000miles on it, and was in really great shape when I got it, but the front end was just way too soft stock...even for my weight of 165lbs...and what happens is that under hard braking the front will drop and bottom out, when that happens you have no ride left and the back end comes up so you crash.....I watched it happen on my bike when my ~200lbs stepson was riding it(before I redid the spring rates) and 'learning'...he was just going for one more lap, and decided to make it a real good one by going as fast as he could, while looking to see if I was watching him...then all of a sudden the corner was coming up fast, so he got on the brakes super hard, bottoming out the front and lost the rear; dumped it hard....luckily he wasnt hurt too bad(mostly landed on his face, but I'd of course made him wear a full helmet) he did mess up his hand pretty bad, ripping tendons in his 'pinky' finger and totally dislocating it

    I've seen a few people on this forum building their first motorcycles and getting their licence endorsement to start riding(don't know if you are a well seasoned rider or not...but you did ask if you can have reverse on a motorcycle, so?) and I just hope that people do spend the time to properly set up the 'sag', spring rates, and damping(esp if they are changing the weight of a bike!) and learn how to ride!
    ...at least watch: A Twist of the Wrist [turn volume down]
    Last edited by T Rush; 06 March 2018 at 1121.

  10. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like
    The suspension is definitely an area where I'm not sure my motorcycle is up to par, but I don't have a whole lot of knowledge to compare it to. I've only ever ridden scooters in the inner city before. The confounding factor is my bike had 70,000 miles on it pre conversion and I have no idea what the previous owner did to it. Is there a good way to check the suspension?

  11. #19
    Senior Member T Rush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Iowa City, IA. USA
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by cjorgensenmd View Post
    ... I have no idea what the previous owner did to it. Is there a good way to check the suspension?
    hmm, thats a good question that I'd never thought of...like how can you tell unless the bike is done and you lock the front brake and bounce on it, to 'feel' it

    I'll go over to my shop Thursday or this weekend and see if there are any markings on my spring sets to tell the higher rate ones from the stock ones...and report back to ya
    ...as my EX500 project kinda stalled(waiting for custom paint) and is still somewhat apart....as I bought that bike for my youngest stepson, then I got hit by a car on it(!), rebuilt it, then when he didn't want it - after that I offered it to my older kid(who crashed it as I posted above) and I started to rebuild it again and change the springs to fit his 6'3" 200lbs size, but now he doesn't want it either!
    ...shame, as I think its a great bike that can take a lot of abuse...like I would have never guessed yours had 70k miles from looking at your pictures

    front fork springs come in different rates, and were pretty easy to find online, and they do sell some pretty fancy new valving to rebuild the forks with better damping; tho the ride height 'sag' is only adjusted by replacing or cutting spacers that go inside the tubes ...but the back is alittle harder to re-do: I just got a good used later gen Ninja 300 coil over for my bike(i'll check and make sure of the years/models that fit) which is only a slight upgrade, but it works and bolts right in, it only has a few 'clicks' you can set different heights by turning the ring on it, still no compression/rebound adjustment for the damping

    having good suspension set up properly and good new tires on, makes all the difference in the world in how a motorcycle behaves, even if you are just riding slower on the street....it will give you so much more confidence and predictability when done right....thats why more expensive bikes have all those suspension settings and adjustments to tune a bike to the person and their riding style


    [edit]
    oh, and I forgot to add that a few big heavy 'ma n pop' touring bikes do have a 'reverse' on them
    ...it only works when the engine is off, and does it with running the starter motor backwards

    I feel you tho with wanting to back into your garage up the hill...I have the same thing(but not a very steep driveway) and a little edge bump to get into the garage, so sucks backing my big BMW touring bikes in there when you're sitting on them
    [/edit]

    I think this is another forum I use http://www.ex-500.com/15-suspension-tires-chassis/ but its been awhile
    Last edited by T Rush; 06 March 2018 at 1719.

  12. #20
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Behind the Redwood Curtain- REDWOOD ORIGINAL!!
    Posts
    544
    Post Thanks / Like
    Also consider using a heavier grade fork oil, like 20 or 25 wt. I think stock the manufacturers use 5 wt oil.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: http://elmoto.net/showthread.php?t=4354

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •