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Thread: Sevcon Gen4Size6 Chiller

              
   
   
  1. #1
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    Sevcon Gen4Size6 Chiller

    I have built 2 water cooled chill plates for my Sevcon Gen4Sz6 controller. I still need to pressure test the whole cooling system when I have time. I learned a lot welding up this "little" project and consumed way more argon then I thought I would. I want to share some of what I learned the hard way to hopefully help someone save some time if they try this on their own.

    1) Al is FUN to work with. It's challenging to weld. It has a protective layer floating on top of the molten metal that requires a TIG to weld. My cheapo Chinese 3 year old 250 amp TIG broke and was time to be replaced. It didn't have pulse technology. I learned how much of an improvement pulse TIG is. WOW! TIG welding is very similar to oxy-acetylene welding. If you can weld with gas, you can TIG. The difficult part is keeping the electrode tip as close to the
    metal as possible without contaminating it with filler metal or "dipping the wick". Once the tungsten gets contaminated, it's game over. You'll have to swap out with a fresh electrode to continue.

    2) Al is an awesome heat sink. Welding a heat sink onto 1/4" thick Al plate takes more than a 200 amp TIG. I couldn't even barely get a puddle to form using a WSE200TIG. The Al plate and heat sinks soak up the torch energy. I tried a few different Chinese manufactured TIGs to finish this project.
    I highly recommend this Amazon machine http://https://www.amazon.com/PRIMEWELD-Stick-Welder-PULSE-WARRANTY/dp/B07BXHRBQ8/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1527487115&sr=1-1&keywords=PRIMEWELD+TIG+225+X
    The price is right. It's probably not even close to the quality of a Lincoln or Miller, but it didn't cost 3 grand either. It came with a 3 yr warranty so I'll see how long it lasts.

    3) Use only Stainless Steel wired brushes and acetone to prep your surface. For welding these heat sinks, use 1/8" electrodes.



    My original idea was to weld some heat sinks onto the Al mounting plate for the Sevcon. Then enclose it and weld some hose barb bungs for the coolant lines.
    chillplate.jpg
    It took so much heat to weld these heat sinks onto the thick plate that it warped and lost a nice flat surface for the Sevcon to mount onto for the best contact heat transfer. So I thought instead of welding the heat sinks directly onto the mounting plate, I should make the "chiller" bolt on to the mounting plate, keeping things unwarped. Here is a pic of the components:
    chiller assembly.jpg
    First I welded the heat sinks onto the chiller's bottom plate:
    sevcon chiller1.jpg
    Then weld a partition to direct the coolant flow through the heat sink fins.
    sevcon chiller2.jpg
    Then enclose it.
    sevcon chiller3.jpg
    sevcon chiller4.jpg
    This unit didn't warp. It sits flat onto a 1/4" thick mounting plate. I will apply a thin layer of heat transfer goop
    to the bottom of this unit and mount it using counter sunk flat head bolts from the Sevcon side of the mounting plate.
    (no pics yet).
    The really cool thing about this idea is that it can be configured in any shape, size, and use as many heat sinks as you want. I'm limited to this size by my modified ex-fuel tank that sits over the top of the controller.
    Here are the two finished chill plate prototypes side by side:
    sevcon chiller5.jpg
    I hope to have the whole cooling system mounted and pressure tested sometime this week. But that will be a different thread.
    Thanks for viewing. I'm open to suggestions for improving the design.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: http://elmoto.net/showthread.php?t=4354

  2. #2
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    Hi there!

    Nice work on the cooling system...

    I also have a tig200P for something like 5 years now and have welded quite a bit of aluminum with it.
    Most of the time I weld at 110-140 amps up to 10mm.

    When welding thicker aluminum, heath it first with a flame heather or paint stripper. That makes a tremendous difference in forming the welding puddle.

    Also, the type of tungsten has an impact and the "arc strength + cleanup width" settings.

    I have even welded 4cylinder bike aircooled cylinderheads. (kawasaki z1000) which are huge lumps of aluminum...
    At 160-180 amps and pre-heathed.

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  4. #3
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    The 225 amp Primeweld formed a puddle very quickly with no preheat necessary
    And it came with a Flowmeter and top quality CK Worldwide flexible head torch!
    Last edited by Stevo; 2 Weeks Ago at 1036.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: http://elmoto.net/showthread.php?t=4354

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