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Thread: 1980 Kawasaki 440 LTD 8kW conversion

              
   
   
  1. #1
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    1980 Kawasaki 440 LTD 8kW conversion

    Last summer, I picked up a nice 1980 Kawasaki 440 LTD with a seized engine for $100.00

    The guy actually wanted $250.00 because, he said, the carbs were "rebuilt" & worth $100.00 each

    So, I said, "will ya take $100.00 CASH & you can keep them carbs, maybe sell them on eBay"

    I took 'er home, stripped 'er all down & cleaned 'er up

    Here is the intro video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkLXnjOEB7Q
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    I just tried to attach a picture & again it said "file too large"

    SAM_4519.JPG 3.40 MB

    Here is a video with lots of information on dismantling the bike.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1IUs5TG9HU
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    The pics need to be smaller files because I think of bandwidth. Try to lower the MB size until you find the size that works. You might need to use photo edit tool in your programs. You know, for flipping or changing contrast and brightness or cropping your pics.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: WORX.VOR.v3.2
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    Figuring out where to put the motor was next

    Here is a video discussing the available options

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Escb_E891e8

    I "finally" got a pic to upload
    ...had to edit it twice
    ...but, it's just a little fella

    How do you add pics so their big & visible?
    ...not a little thing that ya have to click on to see
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    Cool Alternative motor placement idea

    I think, I can stuff the motor "up in the pocket"
    ...mounted right onto the trailing arm

    This way the motor & the rear wheel will move as one
    & there will be a heck of a lot more room, inside of the frame, for batteries & electrical components

    So, now the motor will go where the battery used to be
    & the batteries will go where the engine used to be

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUfhil1jfqE
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    Hmmm... Are you using "the Gallery" to upload your pics into? From there, you can copy the link to your pics and they will show up large on your thread. The Gallery is cool too because you can copy a link and post pics on other forums without having to upload the pic again on that forum.
    Last edited by Stevo; 17 August 2018 at 1007.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: WORX.VOR.v3.2
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  8. #7
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    Decision time

    The motorcycle (Kawasaki) uses "big 'ol" #50 chain (5/8" pin to pin) & sprockets

    My 8kW motor has a 10 tooth sprocket for #40 chain (1/2" pin to pin)
    ...I have a 54 tooth driven sprocket (that I can use on the rear wheel)
    ...& I have ~10' of #40 chain too

    #40 chain is also a bit lighter

    So, we'll go with that, #40 is the winner

    Then, I removed the rear wheel assembly, to switch the sprocket from a 45 tooth for a #50 chain to a 54 tooth for a #40 chain

    Before instillation, I had to do some DIY machine work, on the driven sprocket to make it "fit" onto the Kawasaki rear wheel

    Here is a video with more info

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boTUgLzOe00
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  9. #8
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    We kinda have a plan
    ...now, let's see if we can make it work

    Going to have to
    ...build a motor mount extension shelf
    ...then, get the motor aligned & mounted
    …& add a couple of bearings & an "idler pulley/gear" to help route the chain

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvE4Ir8pxPk&t=5s
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  10. #9
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    Technically speaking, what you call a jack shaft is actually an idler shaft or just an idler. A better placement for the idler would be above the swing arm to get the maximum chain wrap on the sprockets. This decreasing wear, chain noise, and reduces the possibility of the chain slipping.

    Chain idler sprockets are available. They are compact, easy to mount, and cheap: https://www.amazon.com/Idler-Sprocke.../dp/B00O57YAL4 They can be mounted with a single shear bolt on a heavy bracket or with a double shear bolt between 2 lighter brackets for more strength. The idler sprocket would have to be mounted well back on the swing arm to allow the chain to clear the inside of the swing arm. Some bikes may not have enough clearance in this area. The front and rear sprockets may have to be moved in to create more clearance. Or, the swing arm flattened slightly on the inside near the rear sprocket teeth.
    Last edited by Electro Flyers; 18 August 2018 at 1902.
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  11. #10
    Senior Member Functional Artist's Avatar
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    Ya, I know. I've done a lot of work on go karts & jack shafts are used a lot.
    I just working with technology & terms that I was used to & also parts that I already had, to work with.

    I was thinkin' strength. Most idlers, that I knew of were for light duty situations like routing belts on car engines.
    I figured this big motor, motivating a full size motorcycle, would apply much more pressure/force.
    I guess you could call it a DIY super HD idler/(1) sprocket jackshaft.

    I can't put anything above the swing arm, that where the motor is going to be mounted (it fills the whole space)
    It looks like this set up will but, I appreciate the input, stay tuned

    Here is a video with more info

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0ReyyFYkKk&t=190s
    IP

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