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Thread: WORX.VOR.EMC.v3.3

              
   
   
  1. #1
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    WORX.VOR.EMC.v3.3

    It's been a while but I finally have time to sit down and edit some pics and write up the new and improved v3.3!
    What's new?
    1) modified frame/batt box mounts
    2) newly designed and much lighter motor mount plate
    3) newly designed BattBox
    4) addition of Thunderstruck BMS
    5) newly designed dashboard with camera hole cutout for my phone's camera


    I changed the battery box using Harbor Freight pelican box knock-offs. I was hoping to add two more cells to 26, but ended up keeping it at 24, simply because the Thunderstruck BMS allows 24 cells. To add more cells was another expensive module, which would allow 12 more cells. Not really worth the expense just to add 2 more cells. I'm sure the boxes aren't waterproof, but a bead of silicone should make them fairly weather proof.
    They don't look too ridiculous IMHO. They are big enough to squeeze in all of the electrical components (main fuse, contactor, hall sensor, Cycle Analyst shunt) along with the cells. Deciding where to put all of the cable/wire pass-throughs was a challenge. I also added some frame sliders to the design, to help protect the battboxes when I crash
    I was also hoping to lighten up the bike a bit... It now weighs in at 419.6 lbs (190.3 kg) ... still too heavy!

    I wasn't using a BMS before because there weren't any affordable options yet. I was manually balancing the cells, and this mod is truly worth every penny to simplify life!! For under $500, the Thunderstruck BMS is affordable and works very well. I splurged and bought the touch screen display too, although it isn't necessary for the BMS to operate. I'm quite happy with this new addition. The display makes it super easy to monitor each cell during the charging process. I highly recommend this product.

    Now, the PICTURES!!

    First, the battery box...

    The center box bolts to the frame slightly differently then before. The motor mount bolts directly to this box also. It's a very rigid design. I don't feel any frame flex while riding. The coolant pump is also attached to it, seen just under the front fender.


    Here you can see the new motor mount plate and the right side battbox holding plate, mounted without the battbox attached.


    Here is how the pelican box knock-offs look when they are attached to the mounting plates.


    Installing the Rt side battbox.



    These pics show how the contactor, hall sensor and main fuse is securely stuffed into the box, using dense foam rubber (3 lb density closed cell foam).
    This is the the Rt side box, the pack + side.


    I constructed the the pack with thin rubber sheet in between each cell, and 1/8" thick silicone sheet between each set of electrodes. I'm confident there will be no arcing between cell pairs. There is some debate regarding separation of cells with metal sheet to contain a "run away" event.
    My pack is divided into 3 compartments, 9 cells in each side box, and 6 cells in the center box. I conferred with Patrick, who I bought the cells from (theFREElaker here on this forum) and we both agreed that the extra complexity wasn't necessary. Time will tell
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.3
    WORX.VOR.v3.2

  2. #2
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    The left side box is the pack - side. It has the shunt for the Cycle Analyst installed directly to the cell's electrode.



    Here are a few pics of the left side of the bike before the left battbox is attached. I don't have any pics showing the inside of this compartment.
    There are 6 cells ziptied together and squeezed into a foam rubber lining. Its a tight fit because the foam has to compress the stack of batts.
    The ziptie helps to pull the stack out, which isn't easy.

    Here are pics showing the bike finally finished (again)!:




    Last edited by Stevo; 30 June 2019 at 0845.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.3
    WORX.VOR.v3.2

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  4. #3
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    I think it's a functional work of art!
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.3
    WORX.VOR.v3.2

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    Hi
    good to see you still tweaking an already functioning bike.

    As you mentioned you wanted to lighten it:
    Would it not be possible to get 3 more cells into each box on the sides and thus get rid of the one in center?

    greets

    flo

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    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    Hi Flo
    Nice work on the SACHS

    The cells are "compressed" with a 15mm thick layer of dense foam when the box lids are closed. They need to be compressed slightly.
    There is only enough room left to add 2 cells max to each box. The center box is structural and needs to be in the design for rigidity.
    Maybe when the next gen solid state batteries are manifested I can start tweaking again and use this space for an onboard charger and some of the electronic components.

    But I'm done tweaking this bike for now. I now have plans to learn how to make a solar charger and building a solar charging bike port is on my list of next projects.
    I will start a new thread on this topic when I get closer. I have a few other unrelated projects I need to tackle first before I start this.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.3
    WORX.VOR.v3.2

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevo View Post
    I think it's a functional work of art!
    I see what you did there.


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  9. #7
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    UPDATE
    So after a month of daily commuting, and changing the drive sprocket down one tooth, I'm getting about 32 miles before I notice reducing power.
    Thats going with careless bursts of acceleration to 80mph just for $hit$ and giggles
    I plan on getting 4-5 years out of these batteries... and hopefully solid state batts will be around by then. I'll retire these into a solar charged power bank.
    I'll start a thread on building a solar charger when the times comes... but I have to move first.
    Ciao!
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.3
    WORX.VOR.v3.2

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