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Thread: Custom sprocket makers?

              
   
   
  1. #11
    Moderator Nuts & Volts's Avatar
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    Can I anodize a sprocket after its been used??
    Whats under my tank may shock you!!! R6 Build, Blog/, [/URL] OSU Current webpage

  2. #12
    teddillard
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    Anodizing is just basically a variety of plating, so, yeah, you can. As with plating though, if the surface isn't pretty, the plating ain't gonna be either. I'm not sure if the process hardens the aluminum, or if they generally work with a harder aluminum when they make anodized sprockets, though. (So, I'm not sure if anodizing your used sprocket will harden it, if that's where you were going with this...)

    Wait - edit - yes, anodizing does increase the surface hardness. According to the wikipeed.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Remotecontact's Avatar
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    +1 again for Sprocket Specialists

  4. #14
    Senior Member Square Wave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugues View Post
    is there a limit on the torque we can apply on the all-aluminum sprockets ? or it's just that they wear faster than steel ?

    i thought the idea of mixed steel-aluminum from SuperSprox interesting, but probably more expensive I guess ?
    Aluminum sprockets work on 250 HP Moto GP bikes.

  5. #15
    Moderator Nuts & Volts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddillard View Post
    Anodizing is just basically a variety of plating, so, yeah, you can. As with plating though, if the surface isn't pretty, the plating ain't gonna be either. I'm not sure if the process hardens the aluminum, or if they generally work with a harder aluminum when they make anodized sprockets, though. (So, I'm not sure if anodizing your used sprocket will harden it, if that's where you were going with this...)

    Wait - edit - yes, anodizing does increase the surface hardness. According to the wikipeed.
    Ok thanks for doing the research I may try to get the one I just bought anodized then, picked a 64 tooth up for $40 shipped from a local stunter
    Whats under my tank may shock you!!! R6 Build, Blog/, [/URL] OSU Current webpage

  6. #16
    Seņor Member podolefsky's Avatar
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    There are two basic types of anodizing - color and hard (or both). Color increases surface hardness slightly, but it's basically just for color. It'll rub off eventually. Hard is just that - super hard...it's aluminum oxide, which is basically sapphire.

    You can always have it done later if you find an anodizer, but $11 extra for titan tough from Sprocket Specialists is totally worth it.
    - Noah Podolefsky -
    The GSX-E

  7. #17
    Member helco's Avatar
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    just as a side note ,there are also tooling grades of aluminium that can be hardened, i made plastic moulding tools from aluminium and had the pieces hardened cant remember the rockwell number but im guessin it was worth it as we had it done !
    never knowingly understood................

  8. #18
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    Thanks for all the input. Upon further investigation, the stock sprocket is 44-tooth, so I'm gonna pick up a 10-tooth for the front and try out a 4.4 reduction. If it doesn't give me the performance I want I'll get Sprocket Specialists to fab me up a 55-tooth.

  9. #19
    Seņor Member podolefsky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by x88x View Post
    Thanks for all the input. Upon further investigation, the stock sprocket is 44-tooth, so I'm gonna pick up a 10-tooth for the front and try out a 4.4 reduction. If it doesn't give me the performance I want I'll get Sprocket Specialists to fab me up a 55-tooth.
    That'll be OK to get an idea, but a 10 tooth at high RPM won't be happy. I'm running an 11 front, and which is borderline. I'm pretty sure those 10 tooth sprockets are meant to be run under 1000 RPM.
    - Noah Podolefsky -
    The GSX-E

  10. #20
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    Good point, I hadn't thought of that. So might be better to go with, say, a 60-tooth in rear and 12-14 in front? That would let me vary the ratio from 4.3 to 5.0 while maintaining a smooth rolling front sprocket. Should only be about 1" larger diameter than the 55-tooth cog too.

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