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Thread: Questions about proper accessory components for a 60V system

              
   
   
  1. #11
    Empulse R #24 frodus's Avatar
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    ANN and CNN are just different brand's version of a similar fuse style that meet your voltage requirement.
    Travis

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by frodus View Post
    ANN and CNN are just different brand's version of a similar fuse style that meet your voltage requirement.
    Kool, thanks.
    I couldn't find much difference, other than price.

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    What could/should I use for switches for the "small" power systems?

    Like for sending "signals" (ie. brake light switch, or for turning the speed controller on & off)

    It's still high voltage (in this situation 60VDC)
    ...but, a lot lower amperage (~200mA - 1A) less then 5A, for sure.

    * I looked for 60VDC - 72VDC relays, without much luck.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    Use a dc-dc step down from 60 to 12 v to run your lights, horn and controller on-off circuit. Vicor makes very small units and are very reliable, but a little pricey. I see them on ebay occasionally at a decent price though.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
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  5. #15
    I should be working! furyphoto's Avatar
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    You can get non isolated ground dc-dc converters pretty inexpensively from offshore websites. This means your ground wire (and probably frame) will be connected to the 60v battery pack, and a short will run the whole voltage through your system. The victor ones Steve mentioned are isolated so if you accidentally short your main 60v power to say the frame with a wrench when tightening the battery contacts, you won't get a 60v dc shock.
    I think I have a few Vicor units around that might fit your range, I have trimmed the voltage before and passed them on for 100 bucks.
    Lots of budget builds us non isolated ones though, you just have to be quite a bit more careful to avoid a short.
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    Thanks for the suggestions guys, but I think this system is a little different than the ones your used to.

    A 60V to 12V DC to DC convertor is/could be usable, to reduce the voltage, for the (after the fact) accessories. (horn, lights etc.)

    I am talking about the actual 60VDC signals, coming out of the controller.

    Here are some examples:

    The sixth plug in the wiring diagram, labeled "reverse" is where a (normally) off/(momentarily) on switch is to be attached.
    When activated (closed) the speed controller reverses the direction, of rotation, of the motor. (60VDC @ ?mA)

    The seventh plug, labeled "lock" is where a simple on/off switch is to be connected.
    When switched on (closed) it (enables) turns the speed controller on. (60VDC @ ~150mA)

    The eight plug, labeled "brake" is where the brake lever/pedal activated switch is to be connected. (60VDC @ ?mA)
    When activated/switched (closed) it tells the speed controller to turn off/"kill" the power to the motor
    ...& tells the speed controller to activate the brake light too. (60VDC @ ~1A)

    The tenth plug, labeled "3-speed" is where an on/off/on switch is to be connected.
    When switched to the (1st) "on" position, the speed controller operates at "low" speed.
    When in the "off" position the speed controller operates at (default mode) "medium" speed.
    When switched to the (2nd) "on" position the speed controller operates at "high" speed.

    * There is a better pic of the wiring diagram on the eBay ad.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/163370758805
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    Last edited by Functional Artist; 15 November 2018 at 1156.

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    Empulse R #24 frodus's Avatar
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    I don't know that I'd recommend using that controller if they're truly 60V.

    They're usually 12V for the forward, reverse, brake, etc. Only KSI (key on) is rated for full pack voltage.
    Last edited by frodus; 15 November 2018 at 1311.
    Travis

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    Quote Originally Posted by frodus View Post
    I don't know that I'd recommend using that controller if they're truly 60V.

    They're usually 12V for the forward, reverse, brake, etc. Only KSI (key on) is rated for full pack voltage.
    All due respect, but I think these systems are a little different than the systems your used to working with too.

    It may be like that on them thousand dollar controllers. (they may have a DC to DC voltage reducer built in, for the signals, but I don't think so)

    All of signals on these small Chinese controllers are "pack voltage".

    On the 24VDC YC31 speed controller, all of the outputs are 24VDC. http://www.diygokarts.com/vb/showthread.php?t=38841
    So, for the brake light I wired (2) 12VDC bulbs in series.

    On my 48VDC Torsk kart all of the out puts are 48VDC. http://www.diygokarts.com/vb/showthread.php?t=38905
    For the brake light on this one I could have wired (4) bulbs in series, but instead I "rigged up" a voltage divider.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Ted Dillard's Avatar
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    Yeah, just a word to the wise here - controllers in particular, you get what you pay for. (...says the guy with a box of now-junk Chinese controllers)
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Stevo's Avatar
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    You could calculate a required voltage drop resistor at each of the controller's outputs if you know how much current each output circuit is needed.
    Copied from a search, but applicable to reduce 60vdc down to 12-15vdc:
    The voltage dropped by a resistor is given by Ohm's Law: V = I R.

    So if you know exactly how much current your device will draw, you could choose a resistor to drop exactly 7.5 V, and leave 4.5 V for your device, when that current is run through it. But if the current through your device is changing, or if you want to make more than one system and not every device is exactly alike in current draw, you can't consistently get 4.5 V at the device using just a resistor.

    Your other options include

    A linear regulator. This is basically a variable resistor that will adjust it's value to keep the output where you want it. This is probably only a good solution if your device draws very little power (maybe up to 100 mA).

    A shunt regulator. This means using a resistor to drop the voltage like you are suggesting, but then adding an extra device in parallel with the load to control the voltage. The shunt regulator will adjust its current (within limits) to keep the current through the resistor correct to maintain the desired output voltage.

    A switching regulator. This uses some tricks to generate your desired output voltage with much better power efficiency than a linear regulator. This is probably the best choice if your device needs more than 10 or 20 mA of current.

    If you decide to try this, it would probably be a good idea to fuse each output circuit just in case the resistor fails. Be sure to use the proper rated resistor for the required wattage .
    Last edited by Stevo; 16 November 2018 at 1216.
    Current rides: '96 Honda Ohlins VFR, '03 Cannondale C440R, '03 Cannondale Cannibal, '06 Yamaha 450 Wolverine 4x4
    Current builds: eVOR.v3.4
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